‎’Slut’ is attacking women for their right to say yes. ‘Friend Zone’ is attacking women for their right to say no.

And “bitch” is attacking women for their right to call you on it.  (via madgay)

(Source: emilys-nostalgia)

comicsalliance:

LADY SHE-WOMAN: FEMALE SUPERHERO CODENAMES AND IDENTITY
By Andrew Wheeler
Monica Rambeau is on her fourth superhero codename. In the pages of Mighty Avengers she’s Spectrum, having previously gone by Captain Marvel, Photon and Pulsar. The Captain Marvel identity now belongs to Carol Danvers, also on her fourth codename after Ms. Marvel, Binary and Warbird. Her first codename now belongs to Kamala Khan, the fourth Ms. Marvel after Danvers, Sharon Ventura and Karla Sofen.

But Carol is actually the third woman (and seventh character) to call herself Captain Marvel in the Marvel Universe. The second woman was Phyla-Vell, who was the fourth Captain Marvel after she was the second Quasar, before she was the first Martyr, before she saved herself the trouble of another codename by dying. Oh, those women! They never know who they are!

I’m being facetious, of course. These characters don’t choose their identities; they’re given them by writers and editors. If there’s a problem here, it’s not the women, but how they’re treated.

READ MORE

comicsalliance:

LADY SHE-WOMAN: FEMALE SUPERHERO CODENAMES AND IDENTITY

By Andrew Wheeler

Monica Rambeau is on her fourth superhero codename. In the pages of Mighty Avengers she’s Spectrum, having previously gone by Captain Marvel, Photon and Pulsar. The Captain Marvel identity now belongs to Carol Danvers, also on her fourth codename after Ms. Marvel, Binary and Warbird. Her first codename now belongs to Kamala Khan, the fourth Ms. Marvel after Danvers, Sharon Ventura and Karla Sofen.

But Carol is actually the third woman (and seventh character) to call herself Captain Marvel in the Marvel Universe. The second woman was Phyla-Vell, who was the fourth Captain Marvel after she was the second Quasar, before she was the first Martyr, before she saved herself the trouble of another codename by dying. Oh, those women! They never know who they are!

I’m being facetious, of course. These characters don’t choose their identities; they’re given them by writers and editors. If there’s a problem here, it’s not the women, but how they’re treated.

READ MORE

New Comics Reader Are Increasingly Female; Not Reading Traditional Comics Coverage

dcwomenkickingass:

Four years ago when I posted an image from Batgirl and launched this blog, I really did believe there was a way to expand the reach of comics and bring in more readers who want to read about female characters and work by female creators. And from the very beginning my theory was that traditional comics media was a echo chamber that were mostly not very friendly places for female readers.

So from the very start of this blog I suggest that comics grow by looking outside the traditional ways to gain new female readers. I wrote about it.  And wrote about it. And wrote about it.

But nothing changed. 

But now … perhaps it will.

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comicsalliance:

HIRE THIS WOMAN: WRITER EMMA BEEBY
By Janelle Asselin
In the overwhelmingly male comic book industry, it has been a challenge for some editors and readers to see the ever growing number of talented women currently trying to make a name for themselves. With that in mind, ComicsAlliance offers Hire This Woman, a recurring feature designed for comics readers as well as editors and other professionals, where we shine the spotlight on a female comics pro on the ascendance. Some of these women will be at the very beginning of their careers, while others will be more experienced but not yet “household names.”

Emma Beeby has written various different kinds of projects including speeches, film, games, horoscopes, and audioplays. She wrote Risen 2: Dark Waters, a game that was nominated for a Writers Guild Award, as well as a Doctor Who audioplay. Her comics work includes Judge Dredd, making her the first female writer in the character’s history.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

HIRE THIS WOMAN: WRITER EMMA BEEBY

By Janelle Asselin

In the overwhelmingly male comic book industry, it has been a challenge for some editors and readers to see the ever growing number of talented women currently trying to make a name for themselves. With that in mind, ComicsAlliance offers Hire This Woman, a recurring feature designed for comics readers as well as editors and other professionals, where we shine the spotlight on a female comics pro on the ascendance. Some of these women will be at the very beginning of their careers, while others will be more experienced but not yet “household names.”

Emma Beeby has written various different kinds of projects including speeches, film, games, horoscopes, and audioplays. She wrote Risen 2: Dark Waters, a game that was nominated for a Writers Guild Award, as well as a Doctor Who audioplay. Her comics work includes Judge Dredd, making her the first female writer in the character’s history.

READ MORE

gynocraticgrrl:

Jessica Rey presents the history of the evolution of the swimsuit including the origins of its design, how it has changed overtime and the post-feminist association of the bikini symbolizing female empowerment. She refers to neuro-scientific studies revealing how male brains react to images of scantily clad women versus images of women deemed modest and what the implications of the results are for women in society.

(Note: As the OP, I disagree with Rey’s approach to putting the onus on women to alter ourselves rather than to alter the male perception of women – brain wiring has plenty to do with socialization and if we worked against the culture that fuels men’s objectification of women, women’s clothing choices would matter far less in terms of how men perceive us and determine how to interact with us).

Jessica Rey - The Evolution of the Swim Suit

hythrain asked
The other day I saw your tweets about how a lot of the female empowerment message is mediated through guys. I agree with this completely, but I'm also concerned. Why? Well, I'm a guy myself and I want to be a writer. For years I've been improving on my writing of female characters and trying to make empowered female characters and spread that message. What are things I should avoid to make the message come out more properly and not filtered?

gailsimone:

I often get this nagging feeling that because I am talking about women and female characters and female creators so much, people might think I automatically have something against male creators.

I don’t. Every new writer is a blank slate to me, everyone gets a fair shot. Everyone is capable of doing good work until they show otherwise.

The gender someone calls themselves doesn’t bestow any magic powers or insight or ability. Some of the best writers of female characters identify as male and some of the worst do not. I would rather read a Greg Rucka female than a female by a merely average female author.

The fact that this is a concern to you is a good sign. Hopefully, it’s not JUST women characters that you want to represent well, because there are lots of other groups that have historically been marginalized and stereotyped as well.

It’s just that historically, a lot of the tropes of female characters have been repeated so endlessly that it is painful to the female reader.

Some things I hope people watch out for…

1) The Perfect Everything. Often, we see guys write female characters as without flaws. This isn’t really what we want…look at the books that have huge female audiences. We do not tend to embrace the perfect woman who never makes a mistake. You can make your females have flaws, just be honest about it and avoid making them similar to stereotypes of the past.

2) The Character With No Steering Wheel. Even more often, we see women who have no agency and no direction or motive of their own. These characters are solely dependent on following a man. I am not saying never write this person, but keep in mind if that is a character YOU would enjoy reading about.

3) The Mystery Of Woman is Bullshit. I hate this trope, the woman who is supposed to represent what mysterious, sexy, tantalizing but unknowable creatures women are. It’s a staple of noir fiction, and it always sucks. Women aren’t treasure maps.

There’s a lot more but that may help a bit. Good luck!

zmerlo:

There IS and ALWAYS be one woman for Superman….LOIS LANE!!
Tweet by @TheManofMight
I hate what DC did and is doing with Wonder Woman, pinning always for Superman when she actually has a great love story of her own, STEVE TREVOR! Diana is NOT and never was a part of Superman’s Family, why DC is pushing her into that? She has her own mythology where they should be working in if they want her book to succeed! They are making her a pathetic woman who can commit to any man afraid of be alone. And that’s unfair for her character, she is no strongest with Superman, they both are weak in that relationship!
Wish DC finally end that stupidity this year! 2 years of that crap is more than enough!
Where the hell is that crystal on New 52??? Someone or something needs to put some sense into power twins ASAP!

zmerlo:

There IS and ALWAYS be one woman for Superman….LOIS LANE!!
Tweet by @TheManofMight
I hate what DC did and is doing with Wonder Woman, pinning always for Superman when she actually has a great love story of her own, STEVE TREVOR! Diana is NOT and never was a part of Superman’s Family, why DC is pushing her into that? She has her own mythology where they should be working in if they want her book to succeed! They are making her a pathetic woman who can commit to any man afraid of be alone. And that’s unfair for her character, she is no strongest with Superman, they both are weak in that relationship!
Wish DC finally end that stupidity this year! 2 years of that crap is more than enough!
Where the hell is that crystal on New 52??? Someone or something needs to put some sense into power twins ASAP!

"REAL women don't wear dresses!" and how Sailor Moon shows that this trope is total bullshit

silvermoon424:

So TVTropes has an awesome page entirely dedicated to how Sailor Moon averts the “Real Women Don’t Wear Dresses" trope, which is basically when traditional femininity is portrayed as weak and ~not progressive~ while women who show traditionally masculine traits are exalted and seen as superior (there’s also a "playing with" page for the trope here). 

It makes me SO MAD how some people think that Usagi is a “bad role model for girls” because she has the audacity to fantasize about her dream wedding, love shopping and cute things, and become infatuated with cute guys all the time. Yeah, all of the other wonderful and inspiring traits she has (like her loyalty to her loved ones, her courage and tenacity, and her incredible capacity to love and forgive) are totally negated because she’s “girly!” Don’t you know that you should be ashamed of feminine things?!

Sailor Moon is so wonderful because, not only does it show an incredible variety of girls, it also doesn’t shame Usagi or any of the other girls for being, well, teenaged girls. They’re never reprimanded for being ditzy and shallow for wanting romances, or cute clothes, or anything. As one review on the page I linked says, “Boy craziness is even part of this, in the way they make the knightly romance fantasy an active one. The girls wanna be swept off their feet by a handsome knight, and, damn it, they’re gonna go out there and find that handsome knight and make sure he does it.”

So anyone who thinks, “UGH, SAILOR MOON IS SUCH A BAD SHOW FOR GIRLS, BECAUSE THE CHARACTERS ACT LIKE GIRLS” needs to fuck off, because that’s actually really misogynistic. 

ohmyimpossiblestars:

autumnagain:

Petition to get Nathan Fillion a role in Avengers 2 so these two can act together.

Please

(Source: gio-bla)